Ransomware and GSuite
January 13, 2020
G SuiteRansomware

Ransomware and G Suite for Business

Small to enterprise sized businesses face an enormous computer security challenge. They have hundreds — or thousands — of accounts to manage. In most cases, not every account holder will have the training or knowledge to take the proper measures to keep the organization’s data secure.

With multiple accounts, there’s a pretty good chance that someone will encounter malware. It just takes an accidental click or two to download and install.

Ransomware encrypts your files then demands payment. The ransom notification promises that if you pay, you’ll receive an unlock code to decrypt your files. Of course, you have to pay in a hard-tot-race cryptocurrency. If you don’t pay, some variants delete your files — a few at first, then more over time. Don’t think a reboot will help: that just spurs the software to delete your data.

And even if you pay, you might not get your data back. You have absolutely no reason to trust the thieves behind the ransomware. Once they have your money, why would they bother to give you an unlock code that works? And why would you expect ransomware distributors to create bug-free code? There’s a decent chance they’re effective criminals, but lousy coders.

Cloud apps and storage, such as G Suite and Google Drive, offer some protection from ransomware. New files you create online will be safe. But just using G Suite doesn’t mean you can’t be affected by ransomware. If you sync files to your system and your system encrypts those files, the Google Drive sync client will dutifully sync those ransomware-encrypted files back to the cloud.

To learn more about ransomware and G Suite for businesses, check out our new eBook: Ransomware and G Suite Business: What You Need To Know. This eBook is packed with tips to help businesses build their defenses against ransomware and keep G Suite data secure. Check it out today!

See Why Backupify Wins SaaS Backup

VIEW MORE